Making Goat Cheese – A Simplified Process

Goat cheese, made from goat’s milk is considered a gourmet delight by
some people. It has been used for many thousands of years
and is one of the earliest dairy products. Its pristine white
color and unique pungent taste has won the hearts of people in the Middle
East, Africa and certain Mediterranean countries where it is readily
available. The pungent taste of goat products depends on the kind of
food eaten by the goats and so the taste of the cheese varies from
pungent to mild. The cheese is soft and easy to spread.

Goat cheese is quite easy to make and it is supposedly healthier than cow cheese.
Because goat cheese is made from goat milk, it is much leaner and more nutritious
than cow’s milk. People who are watching their calories tend to use goat
cheese more because they can guiltlessly add it to salads and cooked
dishes making them tastier.

People who are allergic to cow’s milk can use goat cheese as a replacement. It
can be added to pizzas in the place of mozzarella cheese because it
complements the tomato and garlic sauce and cuts the calories. There are various kinds of goat cheeses available, from hard ones to ones almost butter soft in texture. It is the hard ones that are often used in salads.
For an easier sandwich, you can add some sautéed onions and dried
tomatoes with goat cheese to your choice of bread. You can even add it
to your cereal along with dry fruits, walnuts and honey.

When you taste goat cheese for the first time, you will be surprised by
its ‘tarty’ flavor. The cheese contains a certain amount of fatty acids
that give it this kind of flavor. The tangy flavor can also be attributed
to the kind of food that the goats eat. Their digestive system is
fairly stronger than other animals, so they can eat plants that
are harder for other animals to digest.

Goat Cheese – The Simple Process

Making homemade goat cheese is a piece of cake. All you will need to buy is goat’s milk and a cheesecloth. The rest of the tools and ingredients you should have at home.
Things you will need:

Thick pot with three gallon capacity
Thermometer
Cheesecloth
Colander
2 gallons of goat’s milk
White Vinegar
Salt
Your choice of flavorings, such as parsley, toasted sesame seeds, freshly
grated garlic or green onions.

Heat the goat’s milk in the pot and switch off the stove when it
reaches 180 degree Fahrenheit. Use a good thermometer to check the
temperature because in order for the milk to curdle it has to reach the right temperature. You can either use a digital thermometer or a
thermometer with a long stem that can reach down into the milk.
Pour two tablespoons of white vinegar or
a half-cup of freshly prepared strained limejuice if you have it. Stir and wait
for a while. The milk should start to curdle immediately. Ready a colander
and place a few layers of cheesecloth over it. Make sure the edges of the cheesecloth go beyond the rim of the colander. The colander should be large; you can use the same one that you use for draining pasta. Place the colander over a large pot or heatproof bowl to catch the liquid; this liquid is called whey. Leave it for a few hours.

The dripping whey can be used for
cooking other foods as it is high in protein and other nutrients. Gather the edges of the cheesecloth and squeeze out the excess
moisture. Transfer the contents to a nice bowl and add your choice of flavors from the earlier mentioned ingredients. Cover and refrigerate it for 36 to 48 hours.

Goat cheese nutritional facts

Goat cheese in its various forms always has a great advantage over
all other kinds of cheese. Because it is a protein that is low in calories, it reduces
your total calorie intake. Goat cheese without any additional flavors or
preservatives reduces the fat content in your body and lowers the
bad cholesterol. It is rich and creamy and contains a lot of
calcium, but is low in carbohydrates. One ounce of goat cheese
contains 80 calories, it has less fat granules compared to
cow’s milk, a nice proportion of protein, 5 grams, and only 5%
of its total calories are carbohydrates.