using bakers yeast instead of brewers yeast?

Discussion in 'alt.beer.home-brewing' started by Rahul K. Vachher, Jun 21, 2006.

  1. anyone tried that before? whats the difference in the quality of the
    brew?

    thanks,
  2. PieOPah

    PieOPah Guest

    Never tried it, but I doubt that the yeast would be able to survive the
    alcohol....

    "Rahul K. Vachher" <rvachher@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1150861834.880824.266330@u72g2000cwu.googlegroups.com...
    > anyone tried that before? whats the difference in the quality of the
    > brew?
    >
    > thanks,
    >
  3. anyone from India on these boards?

    where are you getting your yeast from?

    thanks,

    Rahul K. Vachher wrote:
    > anyone tried that before? whats the difference in the quality of the
    > brew?
    >
    > thanks,
  4. baker

    baker Guest

    I've used bakers yeast it for wine and cider. I didn't measure the alcohol
    content for wine, it was 5.1% for cider and the wine was "a lot" stronger
    than the cider, so you should get enough alcohol in your beer. With bakers
    yeast it also takes a lot longer for the fermented product to clear -
    refrigerating helps to clear it. I prefer to use lager yeast for cider
    because of the taste and because it clears very fast being a bottom
    fermenting yeast. I'm not enough of an expert to describe the taste imparted
    by bakers yeast. I would say if you are too busy to bother getting special
    yeast or enjoy doing things as inexpensively as possible to give it a try.
    Aficionados may scoff - so what?


    "Rahul K. Vachher" <rvachher@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1150861834.880824.266330@u72g2000cwu.googlegroups.com...
    > anyone tried that before? whats the difference in the quality of the
    > brew?
    >
    > thanks,
    >
  5. Randal

    Randal Guest

    Rahul K. Vachher wrote:
    > anyone from India on these boards?
    >
    > where are you getting your yeast from?
    >
    > thanks,
    >


    Not from India, but I wouldn't recommend using baker's yeast - it's a
    completely different strain.

    I have read recently that there is beginning to be an interest in craft
    beer in India - do you have any regional or microbreweries around that
    might let you have/buy some yeast? Also, there are many mail-order
    places on the internet - any of them ship to India? I know that
    http://www.morebeer.com has shipped stuff to China, so maybe they will
    ship to India as well?

    _Randal
  6. Rahul K. Vachher wrote:
    > anyone tried that before? whats the difference in the quality of the
    > brew?
    >

    If someone understands the chemistry of why one yeast produces a
    different flavor with the same OG and ending ABV, please jump in. Other
    than to say that the yeast used does make a difference in the result.
    Some yeasts do ferment much faster than others, but clearly something
    besides the alcohol determines the flavor.

    Your evaluation of "better" determines the result.

    --
    bill davidsen <davidsen@tmr.com>
    Beer blog: http://blogs.tmr.com/beer
    Unsigned numbers may not be negative. However, unsigned numbers may be
    less than zero for suffietly large values of zero.
  7. Denny Conn

    Denny Conn Guest

    Bill Davidsen wrote:

    > If someone understands the chemistry of why one yeast produces a
    > different flavor with the same OG and ending ABV, please jump in. Other
    > than to say that the yeast used does make a difference in the result.
    > Some yeasts do ferment much faster than others, but clearly something
    > besides the alcohol determines the flavor.


    There are different strains of yeast, and each proiduces different
    "stuff"...technical enough??? :)

    ---------->Denny

    --
    Life begins at 60...1.060, that is.
  8. wild

    wild Moderator

    Bakers' yeast is a type of yeast used in baking and is known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This species is also used in fermentation of beer and wine. Baker's yeast comes in two forms. The first form is fresh yeast pressed into a square cake. This form perishes quickly, and must be used soon after production in order to maintain the desired effects. Dry yeast is granulated and has a longer shelf life than fresh yeast. In the production of beer or wine, sugar is converted into alcohol by yeast. Today there are several retailers of baker's yeast, one of the best-known being Fleischmann’s Yeast, which was developed in 1868. During World War II Fleischmann's developed active dry yeast, which did not require refrigeration.
    Here are some links:
    • Fleischmann's Yeast - http://www.breadworld.com/index.cfm
    • Red Star Yeast - http://www.redstaryeast.com/products.html
    • SAF Yeast - http://www.safyeast.com/
    • Lallemand Yeast - http://www.lallemand.com/

    Wild

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