differences between adding ingredients to primary or secondary

R

Richy

Guest
Hi,

I'm looking at making a coconut cream stout, with organic coconut and
coconut juice w/ pulp, and I was wondering if there really is that
much difference between adding the (boiled, of course) coconut & juice
etc to the primary, and then bottling when it's all done, as opposed
to waiting til primary fermentation has completed, then racking and
adding the boiled coconut & juice etc, and waiting again for it to
complete before bottling.

I'm not impatient (it sounds like it when I say "waiting again"), I'm
just averse to losing 3 litres of my batch when moving from primary to
secondary. Is the difference in brew quality that much difference, or
will it only be marginally noticeable to the most experienced
pallette?

Cheers,

Richy
 
G

gisbrewmaster

Guest
On Feb 29, 10:01 pm, Richy <moviekni...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I'm looking at making a coconut cream stout, with organic coconut and
> coconut juice w/ pulp, and I was wondering if there really is that
> much difference between adding the (boiled, of course) coconut & juice
> etc to the primary, and then bottling when it's all done, as opposed
> to waiting til primary fermentation has completed, then racking and
> adding the boiled coconut & juice etc, and waiting again for it to
> complete before bottling.
>
> I'm not impatient (it sounds like it when I say "waiting again"), I'm
> just averse to losing 3 litres of my batch when moving from primary to
> secondary. Is the difference in brew quality that much difference, or
> will it only be marginally noticeable to the most experienced
> pallette?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Richy


Richy,

I am going to admit that I am pretty much a newbe when it comes to
brewing but I have been reading a lot about the point of doing a
secondary fermentation and it basically comes down to what you want to
do. Some swear by it some say don't bother. When it comes to adding
additional ingredients to a batch you can add it to the primary. The
consensus is you shouldn't keep the beer on the dead yeast cake for
more then a month after that you may start getting off flavors. So if
your total fermentation time is less then a month you shouldn't have a
problem adding your coconut straight to the primary. For me
personally i feel if I have to open up the fermenter I might as well
rack it to a secondary. It only takes a little while and I have
noticed it does clear up the beer significantly. Then again stouts
are not clear anyway so you may not get a benefit.

My 2 cents,
Matt
 
B

beerboyfeelgood

Guest

> I'm looking at making a coconut cream stout, with organic coconut and
> coconut juice w/ pulp, and I was wondering if there really is that
> much difference between adding the (boiled, of course) coconut & juice
> etc to the primary, and then bottling when it's all done, as opposed
> to waiting til primary fermentation has completed, then racking and
> adding the boiled coconut & juice etc, and waiting again for it to
> complete before bottling.
>
> I'm not impatient (it sounds like it when I say "waiting again"), I'm
> just averse to losing 3 litres of my batch when moving from primary to
> secondary. Is the difference in brew quality that much difference, or
> will it only be marginally noticeable to the most experienced
> pallette?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Richy


Hey Richy,

I like to rack to secondary, but it is mostly because I never seem to find
the time to get my batches into the kegs or bottles quickly. I have not
really noticed much difference in flavor when I don't rack to secondary, but
I will say my beers are much more clear when I take the time for a secondary
ferm. I usually do 5 or 10 gallon all-grain batches. By the way, a coconut
cream stout sounds really good; would you mind posting your recipe, if you
get the chance?

kev
 
R

Richy

Guest
Hey thanks for the two replies I got to my question.

I've wanted to make a coconut cream stout for several years, but was
unsure about how to go about it (I thought about using real coconut
cream but it contains a lot of oil which I thought would ruin the
brew). I found a recipe at

http://www.aircrafter.org/boggs/homebrew/recipes/2006.10.29-Coconut_Cream_Stout.xml

which is an allgrain recipe, whereas I only do partial mashes/extracts/
steeping, so I just followed what they did to get the coconut flavour.

i.e. 1kg of organic dessicated coconut, & 1lt of coconut juice with
pulp

I ended up using 1.5lt of juice as I thought the coconut flavour was a
bit weak (even before diluting to 23lt).

It's still in the fermenter (I set it going two days ago), and the
coconut has settled to the bottom and is partially clogging the tap,
so it's going to be fun trying to bottle it :)

Richy

ps it tastes ok at this stage, even though it's warm & flat and has a
long way to go before it'll be ready
pps I think my attempt at it will be more like a dark ale than a stout

>
> Hey Richy,
>
> I like to rack to secondary, but it is mostly because I never seem to find
> the time to get my batches into the kegs or bottles quickly. I have not
> really noticed much difference in flavor when I don't rack to secondary, but
> I will say my beers are much more clear when I take the time for a secondary
> ferm. I usually do 5 or 10 gallon all-grain batches. By the way, a coconut
> cream stout sounds really good; would you mind posting your recipe, if you
> get the chance?
>
> kev- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -
 
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