Dried cilantro

HelenWheels

Member
A friend gave me a whole bunch of cilantro from her garden. I have only used fresh cilantro and am not sure how dried will compare. Does it lose a lot of the flavor and should I double the dried amount in recipes? Has anyone used dried cilantro in salsa?
 

BrewJen

Member
Dried cilantro does have a lot less flavor compared to fresh. I've never tried using dried in salsa but you can and let us know how it turns out. As for the amount, the general rule of thumb is a 1:3 ratio of dried to fresh, but I'm not sure how that will work out for cilantro.
 

HelenWheels

Member
I put some aside in the refrigerator to use while it's fresh and I froze some in ice cubes for quick use in stews and such. The rest I dried out last night in the oven. So, now I have more cilantro than I will use all year.

A 1:3 ratio? Thank you. I'll try that when I use the stuff I dried. I should start out light and then add more if it needs it. Some people, myself included, are sensitive to a too strong cilantro taste in food.
 

Georgie

Member
I find that many dried herbs aren't as strong as fresh, with the exception of Oregano which always seems so much more pungent when it's dried. By the way, Cilantro is known as Coriander here.
 

Jude

Member
An old Hispanic friend of ours used to put the whole bunch in the freezer in plastic wrap. When he needed some, he would just break off the amount needed and wrap the rest up for later. His "pico" tasted like he used fresh cilantro. I've been freezing mine ever since and have had good luck with it.
 

HelenWheels

Member
That is an idea worth trying. Thank you. :)

I already dried all of what I had remaining before it spoiled. I did freeze some of it in ice cubes also. I am pretty sure I am all set on the cilantro front for awhile.
 

BrewJen

Member
I find that many dried herbs aren't as strong as fresh, with the exception of Oregano which always seems so much more pungent when it's dried. By the way, Cilantro is known as Coriander here.
I thought coriander referred to the seeds only, while cilantro referred to the leaves and stalks. That is the case around here, anyway; I guess it’s different in your region.
 
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