Floating things?

R

Robert Fraser

Guest
Hi

I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I bottled
about a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere warm (22 -
24 deg C) and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.

It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week, but I
now see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the beer
(hard to see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in the beer
when you pick up the bottle.

For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in the
dishwasher.

Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back with
infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but
I want to prepare myself for the worst :-(

Cheers
Robert
 
H

Hydraulic Jack

Guest
"Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
news:423a9338$1@clear.net.nz...
| Hi
|
| I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I
bottled
| about a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere
warm (22 -
| 24 deg C) and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.
|
| It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week,
but I
| now see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the
beer
| (hard to see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in
the beer
| when you pick up the bottle.
|
| For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but
put them
| through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had
seen on
| some previous postings. They were already clean before they
went in the
| dishwasher.
|
| Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back
with
| infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks
yet, but
| I want to prepare myself for the worst :-(
|
| Cheers
| Robert

Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
 
D

Derric

Guest

> ... I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but
> I want to prepare myself for the worst :-(


Open one now and see what's up. 1.5 weeks is plenty of time
to get carbonation (I usually wait a whole 2 days! :)

If it tastes OK, then don't worry! (Most common infections
will make it sour).
 
R

Robert Fraser

Guest
> Hydraulic Jack wrote:
> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message


> |
> | For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but
> put them
> | through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had
> seen on
> | some previous postings. They were already clean before they
> went in the
> | dishwasher.
> |


>
> Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
>
>


Just using white vinegar as a replacement for the rinse agent in the
dishwasher - does pretty much the same thing.
 
R

Robert Fraser

Guest
Derric wrote:
>>... I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but
>>I want to prepare myself for the worst :-(

>
>
> Open one now and see what's up. 1.5 weeks is plenty of time
> to get carbonation (I usually wait a whole 2 days! :)
>
> If it tastes OK, then don't worry! (Most common infections
> will make it sour).
>

Hmmm

Inspection today seems to indicate it has gone away.

Could be the temperature drop, but I suspect that the kids may have
shaken up the bottles at some point, and it was some subset of the lees
floating around.

Will wait a couple of weeks and sample a bottle.
 
K

Karl S.

Guest
Robert Fraser wrote:
> > Hydraulic Jack wrote:

>
>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message

>
>
>> |
>> | For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>> | through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
>> | some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in
>> the
>> | dishwasher.
>> |

>
>
>>
>> Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
>>

>
> Just using white vinegar as a replacement for the rinse agent in the
> dishwasher - does pretty much the same thing.


White vinegar is distilled, I think? If so, it shouldn't be an infection
source. The bacteria that make vinegar are unwanted guests in most home
brewing situations, as far as I know.

Karl S.
--
And whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.
Matthew 20:27 KJV
 
R

Robert Fraser

Guest
Karl S. wrote:
> Robert Fraser wrote:
>
>> > Hydraulic Jack wrote:

>>
>>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message

>>
>>
>>
>>> |
>>> | For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>>> | through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had
>>> seen on
>>> | some previous postings. They were already clean before they went
>>> in the
>>> | dishwasher.
>>> |

>>
>>
>>
>>>
>>> Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
>>>

>>
>> Just using white vinegar as a replacement for the rinse agent in the
>> dishwasher - does pretty much the same thing.

>
>
> White vinegar is distilled, I think? If so, it shouldn't be an infection
> source. The bacteria that make vinegar are unwanted guests in most home
> brewing situations, as far as I know.
>
> Karl S.


Also the dishwasher "bakes" the bottles after rinsing - which I was
assuming was hot enought to kill any bad micro-organisms that may be
left lurking in the bottles
 
N

NobodyMan

Guest
On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 13:23:37 +1200, Robert Fraser <"rf at paradise net
nz"> wrote:

>Karl S. wrote:
>> Robert Fraser wrote:
>>
>>> > Hydraulic Jack wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> |
>>>> | For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>>>> | through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had
>>>> seen on
>>>> | some previous postings. They were already clean before they went
>>>> in the
>>>> | dishwasher.
>>>> |
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
>>>>
>>>
>>> Just using white vinegar as a replacement for the rinse agent in the
>>> dishwasher - does pretty much the same thing.

>>
>>
>> White vinegar is distilled, I think? If so, it shouldn't be an infection
>> source. The bacteria that make vinegar are unwanted guests in most home
>> brewing situations, as far as I know.
>>
>> Karl S.

>
>Also the dishwasher "bakes" the bottles after rinsing - which I was
>assuming was hot enought to kill any bad micro-organisms that may be
>left lurking in the bottles


The heat in your dishwasher, even in the dry cycle, is nowhere near
hot enough to kill most micro-organisms. Hell, some microorganisms
can even survive the heat of pressurized steam within an autoclave,
and that is a fair amount above boiling point for water.

The soap in the dishwasher helps clean and disinfect the dishes, but
the heat within it was never meant to sanitize the dishes - merely to
help dry them faster, thereby helping reduce both drying time AND
spotting on glasses/dishes.

I wouldn't rely on the dishwasher to sanitize your bottles.
 
D

dug88

Guest
use a flashlight from behind the bottle.

when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
beer?
saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
(well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
suffice,
but here is something that works for me.
i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.
then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.

this is far beyond needs but
who cares.


"Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
news:423a9338$1@clear.net.nz...
> Hi
>
> I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I bottled about
> a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere warm (22 - 24 deg C)
> and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.
>
> It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week, but I now
> see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the beer (hard to
> see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in the beer when you
> pick up the bottle.
>
> For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
> through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
> some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in the
> dishwasher.
>
> Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back with
> infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but I
> want to prepare myself for the worst :-(
>
> Cheers
> Robert
 
N

NobodyMan

Guest
On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 04:34:33 GMT, "dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote:

>use a flashlight from behind the bottle.
>
>when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
>beer?
>saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
>(well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
>suffice,
>but here is something that works for me.
>i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.


This really isn't very efficient in cleaning bottles. Dishwashers
have a very hard time getting water up inside the entire bottle, due
to their narrow necks and wide bottoms. You could rinse the bottle
very well first to get out any crud, but then you wouldn't need to put
them in the dishwasher to clean them.

>then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
>i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.


I bet. If you did touch them you'd burn the holy living cr*p out of
your fingers!

>this is far beyond needs but
>who cares.
>
>
 
T

Tom Lampman

Guest
Watch oven sterilizing! Yes, they are sterilized, but the high heat will,
over time, weaken the glass and you will find bottles breaking with the
least little handling.
Good hot water wash with soap and bottle brush - very hot water rinse should
be all you need for excellent sanitation.
Tom
"dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:tFJ4e.906652$Xk.773055@pd7tw3no...
> use a flashlight from behind the bottle.
>
> when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
> beer?
> saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
> (well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
> suffice,
> but here is something that works for me.
> i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.
> then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
> i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.
>
> this is far beyond needs but
> who cares.
>
>
> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
> news:423a9338$1@clear.net.nz...
> > Hi
> >
> > I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I bottled

about
> > a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere warm (22 - 24 deg

C)
> > and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.
> >
> > It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week, but I

now
> > see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the beer (hard

to
> > see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in the beer when you
> > pick up the bottle.
> >
> > For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
> > through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
> > some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in the
> > dishwasher.
> >
> > Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back with
> > infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but

I
> > want to prepare myself for the worst :-(
> >
> > Cheers
> > Robert

>
>
 
N

NobodyMan

Guest
I wouldn't use soap, or at least not ordinary dish soap. It will
leave a film inside the bottle, interfering with head retention when
you pour (if you care about your beer having a head, take note!).

I just rinse my bottles a few time after I pour from them, then let
them dry on my bottle tree. Rinsing immediately always gets rid of
the leftover yeast in the bottom with nothing visible left. Then I
just sanitize on bottling day with iodophor, bottle, cap, wait, and
enjoy.

On Thu, 7 Apr 2005 10:53:46 -0600, "Tom Lampman"
<tlampman@incentre.net> wrote:

>Watch oven sterilizing! Yes, they are sterilized, but the high heat will,
>over time, weaken the glass and you will find bottles breaking with the
>least little handling.
>Good hot water wash with soap and bottle brush - very hot water rinse should
>be all you need for excellent sanitation.
>Tom
>"dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote in message
>news:tFJ4e.906652$Xk.773055@pd7tw3no...
>> use a flashlight from behind the bottle.
>>
>> when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
>> beer?
>> saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
>> (well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
>> suffice,
>> but here is something that works for me.
>> i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.
>> then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
>> i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.
>>
>> this is far beyond needs but
>> who cares.
>>
>>
>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
>> news:423a9338$1@clear.net.nz...
>> > Hi
>> >
>> > I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I bottled

>about
>> > a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere warm (22 - 24 deg

>C)
>> > and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.
>> >
>> > It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week, but I

>now
>> > see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the beer (hard

>to
>> > see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in the beer when you
>> > pick up the bottle.
>> >
>> > For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>> > through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
>> > some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in the
>> > dishwasher.
>> >
>> > Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back with
>> > infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but

>I
>> > want to prepare myself for the worst :-(
>> >
>> > Cheers
>> > Robert

>>
>>

>
 
D

dug88

Guest
agreed dishwasher sanitize is not kool.
i wrote a page on the technique i use with the dishwasher.
find it somewhere on this page.

vinegar rinse is OKAY, but not really a great highlight. it only makes a
clear finish to wash a window.
streaking is usually caused by hard water.
take a small jar you can seal, mix, dishwash detergent and washing soda.
about 2 to 1 mix. don't BUY cheap soap to begin with.
considering this chat is also about the plates you eat off, cheap is not a
good thing, unless eating residue is a good thing for you.

dishwasher is merely a cleaner. the oven is my AUTTOCLAVE.

"NobodyMan" <none@none.net> wrote in message
news:9ppp31pee0ccgl4monm7mmfnalu5g39b0g@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 13:23:37 +1200, Robert Fraser <"rf at paradise net
> nz"> wrote:
>
>>Karl S. wrote:
>>> Robert Fraser wrote:
>>>
>>>> > Hydraulic Jack wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> |
>>>>> | For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put
>>>>> them
>>>>> | through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had
>>>>> seen on
>>>>> | some previous postings. They were already clean before they went
>>>>> in the
>>>>> | dishwasher.
>>>>> |
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Just using white vinegar as a replacement for the rinse agent in the
>>>> dishwasher - does pretty much the same thing.
>>>
>>>
>>> White vinegar is distilled, I think? If so, it shouldn't be an infection
>>> source. The bacteria that make vinegar are unwanted guests in most home
>>> brewing situations, as far as I know.
>>>
>>> Karl S.

>>
>>Also the dishwasher "bakes" the bottles after rinsing - which I was
>>assuming was hot enought to kill any bad micro-organisms that may be
>>left lurking in the bottles

>
> The heat in your dishwasher, even in the dry cycle, is nowhere near
> hot enough to kill most micro-organisms. Hell, some microorganisms
> can even survive the heat of pressurized steam within an autoclave,
> and that is a fair amount above boiling point for water.
>
> The soap in the dishwasher helps clean and disinfect the dishes, but
> the heat within it was never meant to sanitize the dishes - merely to
> help dry them faster, thereby helping reduce both drying time AND
> spotting on glasses/dishes.
>
> I wouldn't rely on the dishwasher to sanitize your bottles.
>
 
D

dug88

Guest
no clue of what the floater is.
but in a few days
take a beer into the sunlight.
without shaking it or anything.
observe if you see a black line on the top where the liquid is.
you will notice it by tilting the bottle 45 degrees.
a thin black line is bacteria infection.

personally, if i got that, i just dump it. i do not enjoy the taste.

before you get heavy on just make a new batch.
where did the bacteria come from?

did you wash your hands before you started?
beer bottle day tends to be inflicting buddies into slavery around here.

the weakest link is the easiest link for contamination.

my bathroom has a bar of sunlight lye laundry soap bar. And the guys must
wash their hands by singing the happy birthday song 3 times, while they
wash.

some of them are so covered in grease, i make them wear plastic gloves.

oh, i have 3 cats. So them finding 3 or 4 guys in the kitchen and dining
room on their knees, is a big temptation.
so they pat the cats.
change the gloves dude. is the next comment.

just implying the clean bottle is not the only consideration.
and you notice i completely let the idea slide by, about having 3 or 4 guys
on their knees in the kitchen. Harleqiun romances will have a book out about
it next month no doubt.

what was i talking about?
i forgot. see you later.


"Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
news:423ba75e$1@clear.net.nz...
> Derric wrote:
>>>... I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but I want to
>>>prepare myself for the worst :-(

>>
>>
>> Open one now and see what's up. 1.5 weeks is plenty of time
>> to get carbonation (I usually wait a whole 2 days! :)
>>
>> If it tastes OK, then don't worry! (Most common infections
>> will make it sour).
>>

> Hmmm
>
> Inspection today seems to indicate it has gone away.
>
> Could be the temperature drop, but I suspect that the kids may have shaken
> up the bottles at some point, and it was some subset of the lees floating
> around.
>
> Will wait a couple of weeks and sample a bottle.
 
D

dug88

Guest
dish washer will clean it, maybe even dry it.
but bateria live even beyond 250 fahrenheit.
even past boiling
not relly a good idea to go beyond 300 in a domestic CLEAN (yes i said
clean) oven), but it does work quite well for me.

"Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
news:423ccfe4$1@clear.net.nz...
> Karl S. wrote:
>> Robert Fraser wrote:
>>
>>> > Hydraulic Jack wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> |
>>>> | For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>>>> | through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen
>>>> on
>>>> | some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in
>>>> the
>>>> | dishwasher.
>>>> |
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> Vineagar rinse? What's up with that? HJ
>>>>
>>>
>>> Just using white vinegar as a replacement for the rinse agent in the
>>> dishwasher - does pretty much the same thing.

>>
>>
>> White vinegar is distilled, I think? If so, it shouldn't be an infection
>> source. The bacteria that make vinegar are unwanted guests in most home
>> brewing situations, as far as I know.
>>
>> Karl S.

>
> Also the dishwasher "bakes" the bottles after rinsing - which I was
> assuming was hot enought to kill any bad micro-organisms that may be left
> lurking in the bottles
 
C

Chris *Sydney, Australia*

Guest
Dug88
do you get any smashing at that temp?
how do you fit them all in your oven?

will this also work for plastic ones? *smile*


"dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:tFJ4e.906652$Xk.773055@pd7tw3no...
> use a flashlight from behind the bottle.
>
> when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
> beer?
> saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
> (well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
> suffice,
> but here is something that works for me.
> i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.
> then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
> i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.
>
> this is far beyond needs but
> who cares.
>
>
> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
> news:423a9338$1@clear.net.nz...
>> Hi
>>
>> I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I bottled about
>> a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere warm (22 - 24 deg
>> C) and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.
>>
>> It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week, but I now
>> see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the beer (hard to
>> see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in the beer when you
>> pick up the bottle.
>>
>> For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>> through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
>> some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in the
>> dishwasher.
>>
>> Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back with
>> infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet, but
>> I want to prepare myself for the worst :-(
>>
>> Cheers
>> Robert

>
>
 
D

dug88

Guest
besides being a slightly challenged person.
i assume you do more than rinse out the crud and refill it.
which part did you disagree with?
the checking for bacterial infection,
cleaning in a dishwasher,
waving a pregnant duck over your cleaned bottles.
or putting the cleaned bottles into the oven and heating and cooling them,
before filling them.
somehow COOLING the bottle does not seem to have occured to you.
i find no problem giving you the STATUS of the page.
but being a bitch, just for being a bitch, is not helping the people asking
questions.
i assume they have books, i suggested one several times. good info.


"NobodyMan" <none@none.net> wrote in message
news:7cu8515la7utalcbvdfbhp8d90f3o7te52@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 04:34:33 GMT, "dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote:
>
>>use a flashlight from behind the bottle.
>>
>>when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
>>beer?
>>saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
>>(well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
>>suffice,
>>but here is something that works for me.
>>i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.

>
> This really isn't very efficient in cleaning bottles. Dishwashers
> have a very hard time getting water up inside the entire bottle, due
> to their narrow necks and wide bottoms. You could rinse the bottle
> very well first to get out any crud, but then you wouldn't need to put
> them in the dishwasher to clean them.
>
>>then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
>>i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.

>
> I bet. If you did touch them you'd burn the holy living cr*p out of
> your fingers!
>
>>this is far beyond needs but
>>who cares.
>>
>>

>
>
>
 
D

dug88

Guest
what?
wow!
didn't know that
maybe you should tell dow corning and pyrex that their glass oven products
will break with the smallest touch.

tell ya what
bitch at me anytime
when you know zero about zero please shut up.
you guys did some good but WRONG ideas, can put you in a dark spot.

oh and never get too busy to delete my word count, to make youself pretty.
what you do for sanitary is up to you, i could care less.
pick your nose and flick a booger if it is good for you.

"Tom Lampman" <tlampman@incentre.net> wrote in message
news:7ZidnTs85Yg5-MjfRVn-oA@incentre.net...
> Watch oven sterilizing! Yes, they are sterilized, but the high heat will,
> over time, weaken the glass and you will find bottles breaking with the
> least little handling.
> Good hot water wash with soap and bottle brush - very hot water rinse
> should
> be all you need for excellent sanitation.
> Tom
> "dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote in message
> news:tFJ4e.906652$Xk.773055@pd7tw3no...
>> use a flashlight from behind the bottle.
>>
>> when you look at it does it leave a black line on the surface edge of the
>> beer?
>> saw many omments of sterilizing a beer bottle.
>> (well perhaps waving a pregnant duck over your cleanedd bottles will
>> suffice,
>> but here is something that works for me.
>> i wash and clean the bottles in the ishwasher lower shelf.
>> then i put the bottles into the oven at 450 fahreheit, for 2 hours.
>> i do not touch them agian until i reload the bottles.
>>
>> this is far beyond needs but
>> who cares.
>>
>>
>> "Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
>> news:423a9338$1@clear.net.nz...
>> > Hi
>> >
>> > I just checked a small batch of pale ale (half mash) that I bottled

> about
>> > a week and a half ago. It has been sitting somewhere warm (22 - 24 deg

> C)
>> > and I was about to put it in the cellar to mature.
>> >
>> > It was beautifully clear when bottled, and for at least a week, but I

> now
>> > see there is some sort of black grit floating around in the beer (hard

> to
>> > see as I use amber glass bottles) It moves around in the beer when you
>> > pick up the bottle.
>> >
>> > For the first time ever, I didn't steralise the bottles, but put them
>> > through the dishwasher (hot wash, no soap, vinegar rinse) I had seen on
>> > some previous postings. They were already clean before they went in
>> > the
>> > dishwasher.
>> >
>> > Does it sound like my attempt at time saving has paid me back with
>> > infected beer? I won't be opening one for at least three weeks yet,
>> > but

> I
>> > want to prepare myself for the worst :-(
>> >
>> > Cheers
>> > Robert

>>
>>

>
>
 
N

NobodyMan

Guest
On Mon, 02 May 2005 12:28:31 GMT, "dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote:

>besides being a slightly challenged person.
>i assume you do more than rinse out the crud and refill it.
>which part did you disagree with?
>the checking for bacterial infection,
>cleaning in a dishwasher,


Bingo. Putting bottles in a dishwasher to clean them is not
effective. The shape of the bottles prevents the water stream from
completely cleaning them..

>waving a pregnant duck over your cleaned bottles.


Well that may be your method, but do you enjoy the flavor imparted in
your beer as the duck craps in the bottles prior to you filling them?
I wouldn't!

>or putting the cleaned bottles into the oven and heating and cooling them,
>before filling them.


Completely unecessary, and frankly overkill. No-rinse chemical
sanitization is easier, quicker, and possibly less harmful to the
bottles.

>somehow COOLING the bottle does not seem to have occured to you.
>i find no problem giving you the STATUS of the page.
>but being a bitch, just for being a bitch, is not helping the people asking
>questions.


Your completely wrong and bad advice also doesn't help those asking
questions. That's what I object to. Yet you keep posting your
patently bad advice........
 
N

NobodyMan

Guest
On Mon, 02 May 2005 12:28:31 GMT, "dug88" <dug88@shaw.ca> wrote:

>what?
>wow!
>didn't know that
>maybe you should tell dow corning and pyrex that their glass oven products
>will break with the smallest touch.


There is a HUGE difference between products made to be specifically
oven safe versus beer bottles, which were never meant to be put in an
oven.
 
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