Hard liquor

wild

Moderator
I don't know what country you are in but here in America, distilling is illegal.
 

Jason

Charlie Mops wannabe
Staff member
Sadly distilling in any form is illegal in America. That includes freezing to make things like apple jack.

I do not even think you can distill to make vehicle fuel.
 

wild

Moderator
I do not even think you can distill to make vehicle fuel.
Sure you can but you need the proper permits and proof that you're distilling one type of alcohol for fuel and not the other for drinking.
 

Missme

New Member
There is a store in the city where I live that sells distilling equipment, a friend of my aunt's makes his own hard liquor, I am not sure if it is legal or not here.
 

wild

Moderator
There is a store in the city where I live that sells distilling equipment, a friend of my aunt's makes his own hard liquor, I am not sure if it is legal or not here.
The equipment most likely is for distilling water. My LHBS also sells "distilling equipment" for distilling water.
 

aroma

Member
Distilling is illegal here...Running a still could be dangerous, especially at your very own home. You may be doing the wrong techniques...Alcohol is flammable.
 

J.B.

New Member
Back in the day making moonshine was not nearly as dangerous as drinking it. People using old car radiators and what not as part of their distillery. Now it's all about money. The feds charge over $13 per gallon in tax to the distillers, not counting any state taxes. There are only two licensed distilleries in my whole state, and one hasn't even started production yet. Maybe one day they'll realize distilling at home is as safe as brewing and relax the laws at least a little.
 

shortiedrinker

New Member
Wow, that is a great deal in taxes and a little crazy. It makes you realize how many things they actually get away with taxing us. I mean really, on some of the simple things. I am amazing by the taxes I paid out this weekend, its like they almost have everything on their tax list.
 

Paulsey

New Member
Taxes in general are horrid. They wonder why so many people are starving, well after the taxes get paid, there isn't too much left. there is an ongoing debate over minimum wage here.
 

madscientist

New Member
Hard liquor is pretty much illegal to make everywhere, except New Zealand I think. Oh man, I remember the days of drinking the neighbor's moonshine and eggnog, what a Christmas that was!
 

NewToBrew

New Member
I knew someone once who was trying to making their own spirits, let's just say it didn't turn out well for him. I think that's because it's illegal and all the mis-information that's on the net, there's too many ways to go wrong.
 

Paulsey

New Member
I agree. There is no good information out there that is readily available and unfortunately, the people who would have made their.own are mostly too old to do it still, deceased, or can't remember,
 

birchbarlady

New Member
u can buy the superyeast packagges at most brew supply stores. they produce up to 23%? alcohol

then u can buy the flavourings to make whatever u want, rye, whisky, rums etc. try this link abccork.com - this is for canada by the way. don't know if u have to have a business tho to order from them but your local brew store should be able to help. i make this stuff and it turns out great .

i have brewing the superyeast packages and have recently been told that all that is in them basically is wine yeast and yeast nutrient. i bought some wine yeast and the nutrient but when i read on the package that comes with the superyeast (actually, it's the "extreme alcobase" by Pure Brewers, the list of ingredients says "high alcohol distiller's yeast, yeast nutrient, water activated carbon, bentonite, and preservative (sulphur dioxide). anyone know if i can just go ahead and use the yeast and the yeast nutrient and then of course sugar and water. how much yeast nutrient should use?:confused:
 

Casey

New Member
I have a home water distiller. Are all distillers the same or do specific ones need to be utilitized for liquor. My understanding is all the distiller is remove minerals from the water. Maybe liquor distilling is different even though it bears the same term?
 

wild

Moderator
A water distiller collects condensation from steam. A still works in much the same way by collecting alcohol. The big difference is the separation of the two alcohols. One gives you a nice warm feeling and the other kills you.
 

angeson

Defender of the swill
There are 2 primary types of stills 1. pot stills are the ones great grandad used to make shine and apple brandy.It required multiple runs to produce high alcohol.Hence the XXXs on the jug in the cartoons indicating it was run 3 times. The more modern is 2. a refluxing (fractionating) still. It is capable of making fuel in one pass. The process begins with making a ferment like starting a beer or wine.The turbo yeast can ferment very fast and probably would not make a nice wine but for distilling purposes it does the job. When the distilling commences you throw away the "head" (first liquid) as it may contain methol alcohol,a poison,with a boiling point of around 158'F. Then you capture the main ferment as your "product" Ethyl alcohol w/boiling point of 165'F and then collect the "tails" a more dilute portion of the ferment. The tails get re ran in your next batch. The shine from a fractionating still will be + or - 160 proof and is normally dilutes back to 80 or 100 for flavoring or consumption. Rums would be made of cane juice,whiskeys corn and grains,brandies from fruits and berries and vodkas can be anything from grains to potatoes. It is pretty easy to get a federal license to make fuel but you are required to include a photo of your still.That's a toughy unless you are serious. Anyhow that's what the guy from New Zealand said.Good luck.:rolleyes:
 
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