Isomerized hop pellets

  • Thread starter F. George McDuffee
  • Start date
F

F. George McDuffee

Guest
Given the world-wide shortage of hops and the resulting rise in
prices/shortages, why is there not more effort to supply
isomerized hop pellets to the home brewer, and/or more demand
from the home brewer for hops in the form of isomerized pellets?

While the use of whole hops and long boils are traditional, "time
marches on," and the ability to both reduce boil time [for
isomerization] and the quantity of hops required [utilization and
flavor hops can contribute significant bittering when isomerized]
appears to be very attractive.

Does anyone know where home brewer quantities of isomerized hop
pellets and/or hop extract can be purchased in the US?

If you are not familiar with isomerized hop pellets a few sites
with information [but not home brewer sales] click on
http://www.hopunion.com/sitemap.shtml
http://www.hopsteiner.com/isomerized.htm
http://www.hopsteiner.com/pdf/products/ModPellets-03.pdf
http://www.beer-brewing.com/apex/hops/hop_products.htm
http://www.barthhaasgroup.com/cmsdk/content/bhg/products/isopellets.pdf


Extract
http://morebeer.com/view_product/7835/102162
 
P

Pierre Jelenc

Guest
F. George McDuffee <gmcduffee@mcduffee-associates.us> writes:
> Given the world-wide shortage of hops and the resulting rise in
> prices/shortages, why is there not more effort to supply
> isomerized hop pellets to the home brewer, and/or more demand
> from the home brewer for hops in the form of isomerized pellets?


Isomerized alpha acids are soluble! If you isomerize hops before
pelletting, there's nothing left in the cones, it's all gone into
solution.

You *can* buy (or at least could) isomerized hop extract, in the form of a
very bitter solution.

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
Home Office Records www.homeofficerecords.com
 
B

Bill Velek

Guest
Pierre Jelenc wrote:

snip

> Isomerized alpha acids are soluble!


Does this mean that alpha acids are NOT water soluble _before_ they are
isomerized? I know that bittering hops need to be boiled a long time in
order to isomerize the AA, but I never understood what that really meant
or its purpose; I just looked up the meaning of 'isomer' and 'isomerize'
but that didn't help. Anyway, I had just assumed that the necessity of
a long boil just meant that it takes that much time to _extract_ the AA
from the hops. But now that I think of it, the AA is contained in the
lupulin glands, which probably burst very quickly in the boil; so why
isn't the beer bittered more quickly? Your implication could be the
answer; if they are not soluable yet, then they probably wouldn't remain
in the beer to bitter it, and will either settle to the bottom or float,
but either way would separate them from the beer. Making them soluable
(dissolving them?) would incorporate them into the beer and make it
bitter, right? I'm just speculating here; that would make sense to me,
but is it correct?

Bill Velek - PERSONAL sites = www.velek.com & www.2plus2is4.com
Join 'Homebrewers' to Help Cure Disease: www.tinyurl.com/yjlnyv
850+ members Grow-Hops, Barley or Herbs: www.tinyurl.com/3au2uv
820+ homebrewer group just for Equipment: www.tinyurl.com/axuol
 
D

Dick Adams

Guest
Pierre Jelenc <rcpj@panix.com> wrote:
> F. George McDuffee <gmcduffee@mcduffee-associates.us> writes:


>> Given the world-wide shortage of hops and the resulting rise in
>> prices/shortages, why is there not more effort to supply
>> isomerized hop pellets to the home brewer, and/or more demand
>> from the home brewer for hops in the form of isomerized pellets?


> Isomerized alpha acids are soluble! If you isomerize hops before
> pelletting, there's nothing left in the cones, it's all gone into
> solution.
>
> You *can* buy (or at least could) isomerized hop extract, in the
> form of a very bitter solution.


I have used a Yakima hop extract in a Braggot with great success.
Since Mead is 90% of my brewing and my planned batches of beer
are all Scotch Ales, I have enough hop extract to see me though
a 5 year shortage of hops. My source, High Gravity Brew in Tulsa,
is now out. But it's worth the effort to find.

Dick
 
B

Bill Velek

Guest
F. George McDuffee wrote:

snip

> ... the ability to both reduce boil time [for
> isomerization] and the quantity of hops required [utilization and
> flavor hops can contribute significant bittering when isomerized]
> appears to be very attractive.


snip

Killing two birds with one stone -- bittering and flavor/aroma at the
same time -- is very attractive, and perhaps isomerized hop pellets is
the answer; is there any indication of why they aren't available to
homebrewers? Perhaps they don't have the capacity to fill demand yet.

As for reducing the boil time, I'm not sure that the sole purpose of a
long boil is hop utiilization through isomerization; I remember reading
something that explained that a long vigorous boil causes some sort of
beneficial 'stretching' of molecules across the surface of rising steam
bubbles as they expand. Sort of like kneeding bread, I think. But
maybe that was just the isomerization process that was being discussed,
in which case a long boil would no longer be needed with pre-iso-hops,
as you've suggested, so there would be significant energy savings, too.

> Extract
> http://morebeer.com/view_product/7835/102162


At first, the price of $24.95 for just one ounce of extract seemed high,
but then I calculated the IBUs predicted to be extracted from 1 ounce of
Centennial 10%AA boiled for 1 hour in a 5 gallon batch with an O.G. of
1.050, using Beer Tools Pro, which indicated an extraction strength of
37.45 IBUs, and then I compared it to the formula provided on the
MoreBeer page for using the extract, as follows:

B x V x 0.0117/30 /.9 = I ... where:
B = IBU's required
V = volume of beer in barrels
0.0117/30 = 0.00039 = formula constant apparently based on concentration
..9 = 90% efficiency rate
I = amount of IsoHop in Liters

37.45*0.1612903225*0.00039/.9 = 2.61747311697083 ml = .09 ounce which
means 11.1 applications per 1 fluid ounce bottle sold for $24.95, or
$24.95/11.1 = $2.25 per equivalent of 1 oz. of Centennial whole hops.

Since that amount of expenditure is essentially the same as a bulk 'by
the pound' order of hops, it's equivalent to paying $36.00 for one pound
of Centennial 10%AA. I haven't checked hop prices lately, but that's
probably not bad at all, and has the distinct advantage of permitting a
brewer to make fine adjustments AFTER the beer is brewed. Of course,
not all bittering hops are the same, and I suspect that it's probably
not just a difference in AA%; this extract only provides you with a
generic iso-alpha acid of sorts, so it might only be appropriate for
making 'adjustments' in a beer that is already bittered.

Cheers.

Bill Velek - PERSONAL sites = www.velek.com & www.2plus2is4.com
Join 'Homebrewers' to Help Cure Disease: www.tinyurl.com/yjlnyv
850+ members Grow-Hops, Barley or Herbs: www.tinyurl.com/3au2uv
820+ homebrewer group just for Equipment: www.tinyurl.com/axuol
 
P

Pierre Jelenc

Guest
Bill Velek <billvelek@alltel.net> writes:
> Pierre Jelenc wrote:
>
> snip
>
> > Isomerized alpha acids are soluble!

>
> Does this mean that alpha acids are NOT water soluble _before_ they are
> isomerized?


That's correct. Boiling isomerizes the alpha acids to a bitter, soluble
mixture. They are neither (much) bitter nor soluble before the boil.

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
Home Office Records www.homeofficerecords.com
 
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