No fizz

T

Thomas

Guest
I've been brewing for about a year, about 15+ batches, so I've got the
basics down. No issues about sanitation, etc. I bottle, don't have a
keg system.

The last two batches (a heavy stout and a strong IPA) were prepared
like the previous, except they were left in secondary a long time
(about 8-10 weeks). I primed the brew and bottled per usual, but no
fizz resulted. Based on the lack of bottom-of-the-bottle crud, my
strong hunch is that not enough yeast survived to condition the
bottles. Perhaps they were underpitched to begin with (esp. the
stout), but still, this hasn't happened to me before.

So the question is, how do I salvage this beer?

I've contemplated dumping each batch into a carboy (I'd purge it with
CO2 first), adding a yeast with high alcohol tolerance (any
suggestions?), then repriming and rebottling in a couple of weeks.

Or, perhaps I could add X amount (a drop?) of the right yeast to each
bottle.

Anyone with ARE (Ale Rescuing Experience) out there?

Thomas
 
B

BobH

Guest
I also have had a couple of batches never carb, or they did and it was
so lite carbonation there was only a tiny cloud of head when poured.

Not all of them where in a secondary for extended periods of time so I
suspected something else. The caps, capper in combination with the
bottles I am reusing. Maybe it was a bad batch of caps?

Sometimes it just takes longer. Up to 6 weeks or more if there was very
little live yeast left. Try putting the bottles in a warmer location out
of the sunlight and shake each one to get any sediment on the bottom
back in suspension.

On dumping them or opening them to add fresh yeast, I would not do it.
The risks of introducing bacteria and causing oxidation outweigh the
benefits.

BobH

Thomas wrote:
> I've been brewing for about a year, about 15+ batches, so I've got the
> basics down. No issues about sanitation, etc. I bottle, don't have a
> keg system.
>
> The last two batches (a heavy stout and a strong IPA) were prepared
> like the previous, except they were left in secondary a long time
> (about 8-10 weeks). I primed the brew and bottled per usual, but no
> fizz resulted. Based on the lack of bottom-of-the-bottle crud, my
> strong hunch is that not enough yeast survived to condition the
> bottles. Perhaps they were underpitched to begin with (esp. the
> stout), but still, this hasn't happened to me before.
>
> So the question is, how do I salvage this beer?
>
> I've contemplated dumping each batch into a carboy (I'd purge it with
> CO2 first), adding a yeast with high alcohol tolerance (any
> suggestions?), then repriming and rebottling in a couple of weeks.
>
> Or, perhaps I could add X amount (a drop?) of the right yeast to each
> bottle.
>
> Anyone with ARE (Ale Rescuing Experience) out there?
>
> Thomas
 
S

Scott

Guest
Hey, I like the "shake em up" idea. Never thought of that. Worth a
try. I too have a dark cherry stout that has been in the bottles for 2
weeks now and VERY light pffft when opening and virtually zero head and
carbonation :(

I'm a conservationist, so I won't dump them no matter what! I'll drink
them flat! :) I'll keep them warmer and hope they fizz up in several
more weeks!!

Scott


BobH wrote:
> I also have had a couple of batches never carb, or they did and it was
> so lite carbonation there was only a tiny cloud of head when poured.
>
> Not all of them where in a secondary for extended periods of time so I
> suspected something else. The caps, capper in combination with the
> bottles I am reusing. Maybe it was a bad batch of caps?
>
> Sometimes it just takes longer. Up to 6 weeks or more if there was very
> little live yeast left. Try putting the bottles in a warmer location out
> of the sunlight and shake each one to get any sediment on the bottom
> back in suspension.
>
> On dumping them or opening them to add fresh yeast, I would not do it.
> The risks of introducing bacteria and causing oxidation outweigh the
> benefits.
>
> BobH
>
> Thomas wrote:
>
>> I've been brewing for about a year, about 15+ batches, so I've got the
>> basics down. No issues about sanitation, etc. I bottle, don't have a
>> keg system.
>>
>> The last two batches (a heavy stout and a strong IPA) were prepared
>> like the previous, except they were left in secondary a long time
>> (about 8-10 weeks). I primed the brew and bottled per usual, but no
>> fizz resulted. Based on the lack of bottom-of-the-bottle crud, my
>> strong hunch is that not enough yeast survived to condition the
>> bottles. Perhaps they were underpitched to begin with (esp. the
>> stout), but still, this hasn't happened to me before.
>>
>> So the question is, how do I salvage this beer?
>>
>> I've contemplated dumping each batch into a carboy (I'd purge it with
>> CO2 first), adding a yeast with high alcohol tolerance (any
>> suggestions?), then repriming and rebottling in a couple of weeks.
>>
>> Or, perhaps I could add X amount (a drop?) of the right yeast to each
>> bottle.
>>
>> Anyone with ARE (Ale Rescuing Experience) out there?
>>
>> Thomas


--
Scott
http://corbenflyer.tripod.com/
Gotta Fly or Gonna Die
Building RV-4 (Super Slow Build Version)
 
K

KenS

Guest
On Mar 1, 12:52 pm, Scott <acepi...@bloomer.net> wrote:
> Hey, I like the "shake em up" idea.  Never thought of that.  Worth a
> try.  I too have a dark cherry stout that has been in the bottles for 2
> weeks now and VERY light pffft when opening and virtually zero head and
> carbonation :(
>
> I'm a conservationist, so I won't dump them no matter what!  I'll drink
> them flat!  :)  I'll keep them warmer and hope they fizz up in several
> more weeks!!
>
> Scott
>
>
>
>
>
> BobH wrote:
> > I also have had a couple of batches never carb, or they did and it was
> > so lite carbonation there was only a tiny cloud of head when poured.

>
> > Not all of them where in a secondary for extended periods of time so I
> > suspected something else. The caps, capper in combination with the
> > bottles I am reusing. Maybe it was a bad batch of caps?

>
> > Sometimes it just takes longer. Up to 6 weeks or more if there was very
> > little live yeast left. Try putting the bottles in a warmer location out
> > of the sunlight and shake each one to get any sediment on the bottom
> > back in suspension.

>
> > On dumping them or opening them to add fresh yeast, I would not do it.
> > The risks of introducing bacteria and causing oxidation outweigh the
> > benefits.

>
> > BobH

>
> > Thomas wrote:

>
> >> I've been brewing for about a year, about 15+ batches, so I've got the
> >> basics down.  No issues about sanitation, etc.  I bottle, don't have a
> >> keg system.

>
> >> The last two batches (a heavy stout and a strong IPA) were prepared
> >> like the previous, except they were left in secondary a long time
> >> (about 8-10 weeks).  I primed the brew and bottled per usual, but no
> >> fizz resulted.  Based on the lack of bottom-of-the-bottle crud, my
> >> strong hunch is that not enough yeast survived to condition the
> >> bottles.  Perhaps they were underpitched to begin with (esp. the
> >> stout), but still, this hasn't happened to me before.

>
> >> So the question is, how do I salvage this beer?

>
> >> I've contemplated dumping each batch into a carboy (I'd purge it with
> >> CO2 first), adding a yeast with high alcohol tolerance (any
> >> suggestions?), then repriming and rebottling in a couple of weeks.

>
> >> Or, perhaps I could add  X amount (a drop?) of the right yeast to each
> >> bottle.

>
> >> Anyone with ARE (Ale Rescuing Experience) out there?

>
> >> Thomas

>
> --
> Scotthttp://corbenflyer.tripod.com/
> Gotta Fly or Gonna Die
> Building RV-4 (Super Slow Build Version)- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I would intoduce some more yeast from an eyedropper, at least into
several of them to see what happens.

Ken
 
S

Scott

Guest
KenS wrote:
> On Mar 1, 12:52 pm, Scott <acepi...@bloomer.net> wrote:
>
>>Hey, I like the "shake em up" idea. Never thought of that. Worth a
>>try. I too have a dark cherry stout that has been in the bottles for 2
>>weeks now and VERY light pffft when opening and virtually zero head and
>>carbonation :(
>>
>>I'm a conservationist, so I won't dump them no matter what! I'll drink
>>them flat! :) I'll keep them warmer and hope they fizz up in several
>>more weeks!!
>>
>>Scott
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>BobH wrote:
>>
>>>I also have had a couple of batches never carb, or they did and it was
>>>so lite carbonation there was only a tiny cloud of head when poured.

>>
>>>Not all of them where in a secondary for extended periods of time so I
>>>suspected something else. The caps, capper in combination with the
>>>bottles I am reusing. Maybe it was a bad batch of caps?

>>
>>>Sometimes it just takes longer. Up to 6 weeks or more if there was very
>>>little live yeast left. Try putting the bottles in a warmer location out
>>>of the sunlight and shake each one to get any sediment on the bottom
>>>back in suspension.

>>
>>>On dumping them or opening them to add fresh yeast, I would not do it.
>>>The risks of introducing bacteria and causing oxidation outweigh the
>>>benefits.

>>
>>>BobH

>>
>>>Thomas wrote:

>>
>>>>I've been brewing for about a year, about 15+ batches, so I've got the
>>>>basics down. No issues about sanitation, etc. I bottle, don't have a
>>>>keg system.

>>
>>>>The last two batches (a heavy stout and a strong IPA) were prepared
>>>>like the previous, except they were left in secondary a long time
>>>>(about 8-10 weeks). I primed the brew and bottled per usual, but no
>>>>fizz resulted. Based on the lack of bottom-of-the-bottle crud, my
>>>>strong hunch is that not enough yeast survived to condition the
>>>>bottles. Perhaps they were underpitched to begin with (esp. the
>>>>stout), but still, this hasn't happened to me before.

>>
>>>>So the question is, how do I salvage this beer?

>>
>>>>I've contemplated dumping each batch into a carboy (I'd purge it with
>>>>CO2 first), adding a yeast with high alcohol tolerance (any
>>>>suggestions?), then repriming and rebottling in a couple of weeks.

>>
>>>>Or, perhaps I could add X amount (a drop?) of the right yeast to each
>>>>bottle.

>>
>>>>Anyone with ARE (Ale Rescuing Experience) out there?

>>
>>>>Thomas

>>
>>--
>>Scotthttp://corbenflyer.tripod.com/
>>Gotta Fly or Gonna Die
>>Building RV-4 (Super Slow Build Version)- Hide quoted text -
>>
>>- Show quoted text -

>
>
> I would intoduce some more yeast from an eyedropper, at least into
> several of them to see what happens.
>
> Ken


Update! The shaking up a week ago seemed to help a LOT. More PFFT when
opened and had good amount of head :) Maybe the live yeast was buried
beneath a layer of dead ones??

Scott
 
G

gisbrewmaster

Guest
On Mar 14, 3:33 pm, Scott <acepi...@bloomer.net> wrote:
> KenS wrote:
> > On Mar 1, 12:52 pm, Scott <acepi...@bloomer.net> wrote:

>
> >>Hey, I like the "shake em up" idea. Never thought of that. Worth a
> >>try. I too have a dark cherry stout that has been in the bottles for 2
> >>weeks now and VERY light pffft when opening and virtually zero head and
> >>carbonation :(

>
> >>I'm a conservationist, so I won't dump them no matter what! I'll drink
> >>them flat! :) I'll keep them warmer and hope they fizz up in several
> >>more weeks!!

>
> >>Scott

>
> >>BobH wrote:

>
> >>>I also have had a couple of batches never carb, or they did and it was
> >>>so lite carbonation there was only a tiny cloud of head when poured.

>
> >>>Not all of them where in a secondary for extended periods of time so I
> >>>suspected something else. The caps, capper in combination with the
> >>>bottles I am reusing. Maybe it was a bad batch of caps?

>
> >>>Sometimes it just takes longer. Up to 6 weeks or more if there was very
> >>>little live yeast left. Try putting the bottles in a warmer location out
> >>>of the sunlight and shake each one to get any sediment on the bottom
> >>>back in suspension.

>
> >>>On dumping them or opening them to add fresh yeast, I would not do it.
> >>>The risks of introducing bacteria and causing oxidation outweigh the
> >>>benefits.

>
> >>>BobH

>
> >>>Thomas wrote:

>
> >>>>I've been brewing for about a year, about 15+ batches, so I've got the
> >>>>basics down. No issues about sanitation, etc. I bottle, don't have a
> >>>>keg system.

>
> >>>>The last two batches (a heavy stout and a strong IPA) were prepared
> >>>>like the previous, except they were left in secondary a long time
> >>>>(about 8-10 weeks). I primed the brew and bottled per usual, but no
> >>>>fizz resulted. Based on the lack of bottom-of-the-bottle crud, my
> >>>>strong hunch is that not enough yeast survived to condition the
> >>>>bottles. Perhaps they were underpitched to begin with (esp. the
> >>>>stout), but still, this hasn't happened to me before.

>
> >>>>So the question is, how do I salvage this beer?

>
> >>>>I've contemplated dumping each batch into a carboy (I'd purge it with
> >>>>CO2 first), adding a yeast with high alcohol tolerance (any
> >>>>suggestions?), then repriming and rebottling in a couple of weeks.

>
> >>>>Or, perhaps I could add X amount (a drop?) of the right yeast to each
> >>>>bottle.

>
> >>>>Anyone with ARE (Ale Rescuing Experience) out there?

>
> >>>>Thomas

>
> >>--
> >>Scotthttp://corbenflyer.tripod.com/
> >>Gotta Fly or Gonna Die
> >>Building RV-4 (Super Slow Build Version)- Hide quoted text -

>
> >>- Show quoted text -

>
> > I would intoduce some more yeast from an eyedropper, at least into
> > several of them to see what happens.

>
> > Ken

>
> Update! The shaking up a week ago seemed to help a LOT. More PFFT when
> opened and had good amount of head :) Maybe the live yeast was buried
> beneath a layer of dead ones??
>
> Scott


It sounds like you might have it back but I was listening to a basic
brewing radio podcast recently and someone asked this same question.
There 2 ideas were to either add more yeast or get the carbonation
tablets from you LHBS. So in case it doesn't fully work there is
another option for you. Also I think I remember reading or listening
somewhere that if you are in secondary for over 2 months you may need
to add some new yeast to the bottles before bottling this will help
ensure there are enough active yeast to ferment the priming sugar.

Matt
 
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