Wheat beers?

MisterMo

New Member
I have a friend who is allergic to beer. No kidding, and I am thinking he is allergic to the wheat in the beer because of how it is processed. What do you think about a non wheat partial mash. Someone tell me how to make wheat free beer!
 

arcadefire

New Member
I really do not see why you couldn't make a wheat free partial mash to brew with. I have never tried it, but I am willing to bet someone has some kind of recipe that you could give a try.
 

misty

New Member
Mistermo, I am with you on this. Having two people in my family who don't eat wheat, I can understand the struggle of finding information on it. First of all call it Gluten free beet, not wheat free beer. You will get a lot more results when defining it that way.
 

MisterMo

New Member
Oh, when I searched it that way I found a ton of information on it. Almost an information overload. I have always wondered what gluten free meant, now I feel stupid!
 

Lojikal

New Member
Most beers are wheat free and doing a partial mash without wheat is just leaving out all the wheat. The Malt extracts may have wheat in them to add cheap sugars; but you should be able to find some with out any wheat.

All beers have barley and if you're looking to remove that; it's a different story. Which, also if you remove, you now longer have a beer. But you can make some tasty beer like brews with a full mash with corn and lets say rye or wheat as the primary grain plus some added dextrose. But this is a very high adjunct drink you would need to add yeast nutrient, The PH would need balancing and add rice hulls or you'll jam up your manifold in the mash-tun. You can use too much flaked corn though at least not more then 30% of the complete mash.

Or you could have to make Chi-Cha a Peruvian drink. You'll have to find some purple corn or "maíz de morado." It's online you may have to order it direct from Peru. If you would like a ChiCha recipe just let me know.

If you're looking to make Gluten free beer on a at home brewing level you may be out of luck. You would have to do full mash and use Millet and Sorghum; I've heard of the use of buckwheat and Quinoa as possible gluten free grain too.
 

gits

New Member
Very true Logikal. There might be little or no success in making gluten free beer at home but I am just wondering if you will be willing to go through the hassle unless for commercial purposes.
 
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